What is the point of rooting your phone?

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What is the point of rooting your phone and what advantages are there? Does it break the warranty and what phones don't allow rooting?
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Reena

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Posted 5 years ago

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Zaphod Beeblebrox

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all i know about rooting is that it does void the warranty.
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John Lee

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I do not know much but rooting a device allows you to pretty much do anything you want with it. You can run custom roms on it, customize everything, and tweek settings and such.

I think it does void your warranty but people say you can "unroot" your phone back. But if your phone gets bricked, then you cannot unroot and you will not be able to use you device. I believe almost all Android phones have to ability to become "rooted".

I think KID ANDROID should answer this question since he is very knowledgable in Android devices and rooting.
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Paul Deschamps, Mobile Master

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I personally don't root because everything I've need my phones to do so far it already does. Here's a link to a great explination of what rooting will get you http://android-dls.com/wiki/index.php....

It does void warranty of your device if you don't change the counter back so they can't tell you rooted it before sending it away from warranty work. Supposedly Samsung can tell even if you do put the counter back but I don't know how true that is. If you do it wrong you can brick the device making it inoperable so your taking a chance of being left with a worthless device. Although alot of times you can use a trick to un brick the device.

If your not tech savy at all then I don't recommend it or if your phone does everything you want already. When you root your device and use a custom ROM you wont be able to get regular Android software updates until you change it back to the official Android ROM.
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Don

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Having rooted many android devices, I can tell you that flashing back to the stock rom will leave no trace at all of the rooting that took place before. It is also easy to unbrick a phone since the S2 (before that, it was much harder).
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Paul Deschamps, Mobile Master

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Samsung stated that from the Galaxy S3 on even if you set back the counter clock. they will be able to tell that you indeed rooted the device & flashed an unofficial ROM. I read a whole article on it back when the Galaxy S3 first came out.
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Timo Tuokkola, Mobile Master

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Rooting gives you admin level access to phone functions. It allows you to change functions and settings that the manufacturer did not intend to be changed. It voids the software warranty on your phone because you are no longer using the software provided by the manufacturer.
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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Depends on what device you have and what you would you would like to do with it.
All of my Android devices are rooted; Galaxy Ace, Galaxy Ace IIx, HTC Raider, Galaxy S2x, Samsung Gio and an Acer Iconia A700 tablet and I'll be rooting an S3 in March.

Correct. Rooting will void the software warranty on your device, however the rooting process is completely reversible. It's possible to receive an OTA update while rooted using a stock ROM, the only problem is that you will no longer have root access and you'll have to re-root the device after the update. Minor glitch and not a huge setback.

It is of utmost importance that you read and follow instructions thoroughly. I have yet to brick a device by gaining root access. Make certain that the information you are reading pertains to your specific device, otherwise you will run into problems.

There are a growing number of applications designed to run on devices with stock ROMS and root access, here's an example:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/de....

The counter refers to how many times a custom recovery is flashed to the device and there are ways to bypass the counter. Here is one example:

http://forum.xda-developers.com/showt...

Best place to start would be the xda developers forum. In the upper right hand corner you can type in your device and go from there. Be prepared to do a fair amount of reading before you root or flash a custom ROM.

http://www.xda-developers.com/tag/roo...
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Chad Burr, Mobile Master

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Should I worry about tripping the counter?
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Don

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The main reasons why I rooted my devices and the ones from other people are the following :

1. To uninstall those annoying, battery draining, memory gobbling, trolling Telecom apps (such as Bell, Rogers and Telus) that are less than worthless.

2. To unlock your device for free, so you can use it on any network that is compatible with the device.

3. To get updated OS ahead of time. (mainly because the North American versions are always updated later than the other versions of the same device)
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Ivan, Mobile Master

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I always recommend not to root to people that cannot troubleshoot their own phones.

There are many advantages to rooting and I have rooted plenty of phones but it's a constant battle with whatever custom ROM I choose (though MIUI seems more stable than most). Rooting will usually dramatically increase the performance of your phone, but if you can't fix your own problems (and there will be problems), then I suggest you stay away.
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Some random Mobile Master, Mobile Master

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most of the time in my case, when I root/rom a phone, that's when the problems stop... some roms are better than the others, but well known ones are pretty much stable when used on supported devices
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Don

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One little thing you should know, NA phones are a little bit harder to root than the international versions (especially with the Galaxy S2 series, I bricked the bloody Rogers version with a couple of the kernels out there, but like I said before, unbricking a phone is quite easy).
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Chad Burr, Mobile Master

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@don I didn't have any issues rooting my s2. Run odin, flash cwm, use cwm to run root script. flash su. Done.
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Don

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I know, I didn't have any trouble with most S2s. But having rooted every version out there of the S2, the i727r was the one that gave me the most trouble.
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Chad Burr, Mobile Master

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My optimus one came with froyo and I wanted gb so i updated stock. I had to find a Windows pc after that to run Adb and root it. Would've been so much easier tobroot had Inleft it froyo
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00-Evan

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Rooting gives you and your apps access to admin level functions on the phone.

As the user, this gives you the ability to install custom ROMs, which give advanced functionality and settings, such as screen colour tuning, UI tweaks and more advanced/risky but potentially powerful stuff like RAM management and overclocking. Also, most of the time phones are supported with ROMS far more than they are by their manufacturers. My old Nexus S is still extremely zippy thanks to advanced tweaking, and it's running andriod 4.2, even though official support was dropped in 4.1.

Rooting allows apps do things they couldn't before, you can pair a PS3 controller to your device over bluetooth and play games with it, or backup entire apps with all their data.

Lastly, rooting allows you to install custom recovery software, which makes full phone backups and ROM installations a breeze. Recovery is also awesome for fiddling, and counteracting the less stable nature of custom ROMs, keep a backup on hand and no matter how horrific things get on your device, as long as you have recovery you're fine.

If you want to get into rooting, try going to the XDA developers forums for your device, you can find lots of resources there.

For your first ROM and recovery, i'd recommend the latest stable Cyanogenmod as your ROM and TWRP(Teamwin recovery project) as your recovery.

Also, rooting your phone will wipe user data, but this only needs to be done once. Rooting does void your warranty but provides minimal risk to your device as long as you follow instructions. Phones can be unrooted for warranty purposes.
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Reena

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So could you root a phone for At&t to use with Koodo?
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jay

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There's some software to unlock your phone and now if you take your phone you'll get a 10% less on your plan
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Chad Burr, Mobile Master

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Rooting doesn't unlock the phone. This conversation was answered months ago.
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Chad Burr, Mobile Master

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You dont need to root an att phone to use it with koodo. Just unlock it.
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Ivan, Mobile Master

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All modern ATT smartphones should be compatible with Koodo, but I'd still advise you to tell us the specific phone model before we can give you specific advice.
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Reena

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Just wanted to know if there were any restrictions on compatibility once the phone is rooted.
So let's say that I now have a rooted phone,what type of security is there for the phone. I would assume that a rooted phone would be easy to breach with viruses or trojans.
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Chad Burr, Mobile Master

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It is no more susceptible but he damage can be greater of you allow root access to malware. Any application that needs root will ask for permission first. Make sure you read reviews and permissions on applications before installing them but thats true for any phone. I do a nand backup weekly and save it to my pc and then a flash drive. Keep yourself protected by learning about every app you want to ibstall. Reviews don't lie.

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