Family Is For Everyone.

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  • Updated 5 years ago
Everyone, regardless of socio-economic status should be able to keep in touch with family and friends to help reduce and give a hand-up opportunity to the marginalized. Can you make a plan specific to low-income people to ensure all Canadians have access to mobile telecommunication accessibility?
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Marcus Oppenheimer

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Posted 5 years ago

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rikkster, Mobile Master

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I think that's an excellent idea.
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Paul Deschamps, Mobile Master

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You can't get much cheaper than $15 a month on prepaid for unlimited text, then add another $5 if you want some talk minutes. Either that or the $20 talk and text plan which includes unlimited text and 100 minutes a month. I know a bunch of ppl on welfare that have even more expensive plans than these so I don't know how cheap you expect service to be below $20 a month?
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Ahmad

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Get the $20 plan or get a home phone. Having a cell is a luxury, not a need. But that's just my opinion. If you have a home phone, you don't need a cell phone. If you're low income, you shouldn't even be spending anymore money on something that isn't a necessity.
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Paul Deschamps, Mobile Master

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I completely agree Ahmad. Also if you have a home phone get rid of it and get a cell phone its cheaper. If it's not cheaper than your on the phone way too much anyways.
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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Having a cell is a luxury, not a need.

Rubbish. In this day and age, cell phones are a necessity and for many reasons. Look around, payphones have all but disappeared. At one time, you could find one just about anywhere. Think about how many times cell phones have saved lives and how cell phones can offer a sense of safety and security.

Let's say you live in a rural area and you are out for a walk. It just so happens that you are the sole witness to a single vehicle accident on a deserted stretch of road. The occupants in the vehicle are critically injured and you are half an hour away from home. Are you going to waste precious time walking/running all the way back home to make a landline call to emergency responders?

A cell phone would remedy that situation in an instant.

I agree, Koodo has some very affordable plans. Even if you spend the majority of time at home, initial setup for a landline phone is costly. For basic landline service from Bell, your looking at; $27.94/month + $99 installation fee (if applicable) + a one time activation fee of $49.95 + tax.
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Paul Deschamps, Mobile Master

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What you just put is Rubbish sir, What happened before cellphones were even available (invented), did ppl not get along just fine? Yes they did and they can without them making them a non necessity. They are a luxury that has been brought to us in the last decade or two and not a necessity, A necessity is something you NEED to live, many ppl don't have cell phones and live life just fine.
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Chris Petersens

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Rikkster if you want to further subsidize cellphone, which btw I totally agree with the other is indeed a luxury, the case should be taken to the government. Maybe those on the lower socioeconomic ladder can get help paid by you and all other taxpayers. Although that's unlikely to get the support of most people in my opinion.
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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Get the government involved? lol. No thanks.
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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“Today, more than 26 million Canadians have a mobile phone or wireless device – a number that continues to experience significant growth every year,” said Bernard Lord, chief executive officer of the Canadian Wireless Telecommunications Association" - 2012 Canadian Telecom Summit

Still think it's a luxury?

Communication is essential. There has always been the need for humans to interact with other humans hence the necessity for advancements in communication technology. Think back to when radio waves were first discovered.

In keeping with the times you're referring to, things moved at a much slower pace compared to today, but there was still a necessity to communicate. Cell phone technology was in its infancy and wasn't widely available. I still remember when you could find a payphone on virtually any street corner in Toronto.

When's the last time you wrote a letter and mailed it off?

Something that's also becoming a thing of the past. People wrote letters and sent them through the mail. Today, just about everyone has access to a computer and sends an email, fax or if they have a cell phone, they send a text message.

A pager was all the rage back in the day, well before cell phones hit the market. Back then a cell phone was considered a luxury due to price and the high costs associated with using one. This was one of many reasons why people stayed away from cell phones and kept using landlines. In comparison, landlines were considerably cheaper to use than cell phones.

Fast forward to today and cell phones have flooded the market, so much so that, as I said earlier, payphones are quickly disappearing. The vast selection of devices and varying price points have brought the cost down, making it a viable alternative to a landline and no longer the luxury that it once was.

For your reading pleasure...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/sto...
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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If your cousin calls Newfoundland home, is he not entitled to claim employment related costs, travel expenses/moving costs, come income tax filing time?

http://www.relocatecanada.com/revcana...
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Chris Petersens

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Yes, hence my subsidy comment above driven by government rather than the private sector.
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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My debate isn't with subsidization or government involvement. I've already indicated that prices are fair. Your cousin could hitch a ride as opposed to flying, it's not as luxurious as flying or as fast, but he will still get to Alberta, provided he's not under any sort of a deadline. Today is Sunday, if your cousin had to be in Edmonton, AB for nine o clock this Monday morning for a job interview, flying to Alberta would become a necessity, because no other mode of transportation would be able to make the trip on such short notice.
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Paul Deschamps, Mobile Master

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Your argument is that ppl need to communicate making a cell phone a necessity, I still completely disagree because you don't need a cell phone to communicate there are home phones for that. Where I live in Barrie Ontario and surrounding areas there are just as many payphones as there were 10 years ago so I guess it depends where you live as to the degree you actually "Need" a cell phone due to the supposed fading payphones.
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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Kind of answering in reverse

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/report...

My debate is that cell phones are no longer a luxury. Cell phones are an affordable and cheaper alternative than a landline/home phone, you admitted it yourself.

Times are changing and having portable communications is a necessity in this era. Back in the day, a telephone was a necessity. Today, more than 75% of the population subscribe to wireless services and 99% of the population have access to wireless services.

Just like payphones, home phone service providers will slowly phase out home phone services and focus their efforts on making wireless technology just as reliable and as widely available as home phone service. It's only a matter of time.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/sto...

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