Does jailbreaking iPhone hinder keeping the OS up to date?

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  • Updated 11 months ago
I don't want to jailbreak my new iPhone SE, but there doesn't seem to be a way to hide the clock time in the status bar or lock screen.  This is quite possibly a dealbreaker.  I realize that the warranty would be voided if I chose to do this.  Would it prevent or hinder efforts to keep the OS up to date?  I asked this in another thread, but the topic of that thread is not as focused as this particular question.
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andymhancock

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Posted 11 months ago

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Allan, Mobile Master

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I believe you wont be able to update via your phone but you should have no problem updating via itunes.
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Robert, Mobile Master

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Hello Andy,

Jailbreaking won't void the warranty if you restore the iPhone before going to Apple Store. Also, you won't be able to update to te most recent iOS firmware. You'll need to wait until a jailbreak is available before you update.
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andymhancock

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Thanks, Allan, Robert.  Unless there is no way to access the file system on iOS, I don't expect to use iTunes much.

Contemplating jailbreaking is more than just a bit ironic, considering the reasons for which I moved to Apple: (i) to get away from OS fragmention due to the plethora of harware platforms, (ii) the curation of apps, (iii) the greater ease of keeping up-to-date, and (iv) the greater security as a result (at least the perception of greater security).
(Edited)
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Dennis, Mobile Master

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There is no way to access the file system without jailbreaking
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andymhancock

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By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  For example, every three months, on average, with standard deviaton of plus/minus 1 month?  Or perhaps something along the lines of the gut feel that most (e.g., 80%) of the upgrades occur at durations of between 1 month and 5 months, but mostly at (say) 3 months?  (This is just my simple way of understanding confidence intervals and the "most likely" duration between upgrades.  Of course, the distribution doesn't have to be symmetric).

As well, in order to subjectively judge the security risk from the delay in jailbreaking, how long does a jailbreak typically lag an iOS upgrade?  Can this be ballparked in a manner similar to above?  I'm particularly concerned about the delay because (I assume) that some iOS upgrades will be released to deal with zero day issues, and any delay would be...not good.

I'm not an IT or security expert, nor am I a developer.  If this understanding of the risk factors is not accurate, feel free to correct and/or enlighten me.  Thanks.
(Edited)
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andymhancock

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Bummer.  This means that customization apps that rely on jailbreaking are ephemerally functional at best, assuming that one does not want to put off upgrades.  What a weird game that is.  Thanks again for illuminating the situation.
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Dennis, Mobile Master

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If you upgrade (and hence removes the jailbreak) then re-jailbreak, you will have to re-customize your jailbreak apps again.  It is a pain.  When I jailbreak I do not upgrade my iOS unless I absolutely have to (ex. an app I need will not function without the update).  Then you need to restore/update via itunes.  Do not factory reset a jailbroken phone as it can brick the phone.

If you want the latest iOS updates, I do not recommend jailbreaking.  I would recommend a Google Pixel phone, using Xposed
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andymhancock

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Yes, I'm beginning to realize how unviable jailbreaking is if you want to keep iOS up-to-date.  As for going Android, I switched to the Apple ecosystem because I "trust" them to respect my privacy a bit more -- as much as one can "trust" the two titans based on reading people's opinions & rationale online.  I don't like how Google Play took over and activated all the services on my Cyanogenmod phone, I don't like the fact that Google Play is essentially a meta OS, which makes running Cyanogenmod of questionable value.  I like the idea that the Apple app store is a bit more curated rather than being a wild west.  I don't like the fact that carriers get to customize a stock Android OS, or delay upgrades.  I am hopeful that Apple's business model, which is not to sell consumer info to vendors, means that they are less motivated to track users and amass data (albeit aggregate data, hopefully).  It's not possible to know for sure which titan is more benevolent -- one can only make an informed guess.
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Robert, Mobile Master

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Even though it might be unviable, it's still better then Android. Usually, a JB will come with major iOS changes.
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andymhancock

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Agreed.  JBing isn't the only factor that makes it hard to keep Android up to date.  There's the carrier delay in propagating upgrades, and for 3rd party open source variants like Cyanogenmod, there's the debilitating fragmentation of hardware platforms and the lack of dedicated staff to keep the versions for each platform up to date.