Do you know your rights as a wireless consumer?

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Effective December 2, 2013, The Wireless Code establishes basic rights for all wireless consumers and puts new requirements on service providers.

The Wireless Code significantly limits cancellation fees and requires your service provider to unlock phones, to offer a trial period for wireless contracts, and to set default caps on data charges to help you avoid bill shock. All service providers must comply with the Code.

The Wireless Code will
(a) make it easier for individual and small business customers to obtain and understand the information in their wireless service contracts;
(b) establish consumer-friendly business practices for the wireless service industry where necessary;
(c) contribute to a more dynamic wireless market.

For more information, see below.

http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/info_sht/t1...

http://www.crtc.gc.ca/eng/info_sht/t1...
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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Posted 5 years ago

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Get it solved !

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1 Big step toward FREEDOM
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Mark Kokolsky

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Im really interested to see what types of changes companies make based on the new wireless code.
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Zaphod Beeblebrox

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The one fear is the rate increases for plans, features, and phones.
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MatB

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and customers pocket future.. lol
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Mark Kokolsky

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I don't think youll see an increase in rate plans and features. But I do think there will be an effect to phone prices since everything will essentially be max 2 yr contracts. Its going to be another balancing act for companies to find a place where people don't get really upset, but where they are still making the money they want.
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Zaphod Beeblebrox

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I think Koodo is better then that. IMO, Koodo should keep everything as is. They haven't won that award for Customer Service for nothing, ya know lol
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Mark Kokolsky

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I wasn't saying Koodo is going to raise prices, I mean in general youll probably see some handset prices go up. Honestly though I do think Koodo will have to make some changes to stay in the spot they are. I don't think they will have to be massive changes like the rest of the companies, but I think some tweaks are in order.
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rikkster, Mobile Master

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If providers want to remain competitive, they'll have to get creative at keeping prices affordable or consumers will simply shop with their wallets and go with a provider that offers services at better rates. The days of the big three monopolizing the wireless sector appear to be numbered.
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Ivan, Mobile Master

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I agree. Our prices are too high as it is. If the carriers raise their prices as a result of the new rules, I'm speaking with my wallet and going prepaid.

I can get unlimited Canadian calling and text via Fongo while on my home WiFi. I don't need to be constantly connected while out (prepaid for quick calls and texts are fine with me). I realize that this won't work for those that need their phones for business purposes, but it would work for so many of us.
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Some random Mobile Master, Mobile Master

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As a recent convert to prepaid myself, I find I'm enjoying it more and more. It's been 2 weeks now, and my voice booster has gone down 19 minutes. Yup, 19 minutes. At this rate, the whole $25 the booster cost me will last me a full year! For those considering it, do not hesitate!
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Erwin

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I think one of the big changes would be the service agreement. Who nkows maybe its just going to be in points rather than paragraphs or 1 simple paragraph to sum everything up.

Our service agreement is much easier to deal with so it wont really impact us that bad.
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Jonathan I, Mobile Master

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On the subject of service agreements, Koodo's are definitely the easiest. It's barely over a page! Just a little bit spills over into the 2nd line, the customer signs and that's it.

Telus is also great. Their first page details the phone, plan, device balance, and any stipulations such as promotional discounts received and early termination. Then they initial in 4 spots. The 2nd page is basically Koodo's first page and then the customer signs, done. Clean 2 pages.

Virgin is next. Theirs is a bit longer at 4, sometimes 5 pages, but it's in simple english and even throws in some slack language to make the customer feel comfortable, I guess.

Rogers/Fido have some work to do at 6 pages... They could shrink down the phone/plan section a bit but the offender is the terms themselves - too much fluff and nonsense. Some of the 911 fees don't even apply to certain provinces (like Ontario). They need to take a cue from Telus.

The worst is by far Bell's - 8 pages of small font, legal mumbo-jumbo that most people don't bother reading so they just sign on the line and leave.
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Mark Kokolsky

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And then theres the agreements in Quebec, from my understanding they can be up to 14 pages due to the laws out there. But they are keeping the forestry industry in BC going at least.

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