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Does jailbreaking iPhone hinder keeping the OS up to date?


Userlevel 1
I don't want to jailbreak my new iPhone SE, but there doesn't seem to be a way to hide the clock time in the status bar or lock screen.  This is quite possibly a dealbreaker.  I realize that the warranty would be voided if I chose to do this.  Would it prevent or hinder efforts to keep the OS up to date?  I asked this in another thread, but the topic of that thread is not as focused as this particular question.

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Userlevel 7
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I believe you wont be able to update via your phone but you should have no problem updating via itunes.
Userlevel 7
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Hello Andy,

Jailbreaking won't void the warranty if you restore the iPhone before going to Apple Store. Also, you won't be able to update to te most recent iOS firmware. You'll need to wait until a jailbreak is available before you update.
Userlevel 1
Thanks, Allan, Robert.  Unless there is no way to access the file system on iOS, I don't expect to use iTunes much.

Contemplating jailbreaking is more than just a bit ironic, considering the reasons for which I moved to Apple: (i) to get away from OS fragmention due to the plethora of harware platforms, (ii) the curation of apps, (iii) the greater ease of keeping up-to-date, and (iv) the greater security as a result (at least the perception of greater security).
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andymhancock wrote:

Thanks, Allan, Robert.  Unless there is no way to access the file system on iOS, I don't exp...

There is no way to access the file system without jailbreaking
Userlevel 1
By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  For example, every three months, on average, with standard deviaton of plus/minus 1 month?  Or perhaps something along the lines of the gut feel that most (e.g., 80%) of the upgrades occur at durations of between 1 month and 5 months, but mostly at (say) 3 months?  (This is just my simple way of understanding confidence intervals and the "most likely" duration between upgrades.  Of course, the distribution doesn't have to be symmetric).

As well, in order to subjectively judge the security risk from the delay in jailbreaking, how long does a jailbreak typically lag an iOS upgrade?  Can this be ballparked in a manner similar to above?  I'm particularly concerned about the delay because (I assume) that some iOS upgrades will be released to deal with zero day issues, and any delay would be...not good.

I'm not an IT or security expert, nor am I a developer.  If this understanding of the risk factors is not accurate, feel free to correct and/or enlighten me.  Thanks.
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andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

To answer your first question usually about a new iOS update a year. You can view the release dates of all iOS updates here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/IOS_v...
Userlevel 1
andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

Thanks, Allan.  Do you know if those formal version numbers include updates for zero day patching?  I'm not familiar with how (or whether) Apple distinguishes between "normal" iOS upgrades versus security patches, but at least one article describes a security patch as an iOS upgrade: http://www.securityweek.com/apple-issues-emergency-fix-ios-zero-days-what-you-need-know.  At one year apart, the information about the update-interval seems of limited use for the zero-day responsiveness.  

If in fact security patches are rolled out separately from traditional iOS upgrades, then it raises complications that I never thought about.  For example, I'm not sure what interplay there is between security patches and having to seek new jailbreaks for new iOS releases.

I'm not a big fan of venturing from stock iOS, and my jailbreaking contemplation is motivated by pragmatic and minor (but critical to me) functional tailoring.  It seems to me that anyone who has jailbroken should have thought about things like security updates and interplay with "normal" iOS uprgrades.  There's probably a body of knowledge and best practices around this.
Userlevel 7
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andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

The installation of any iOS update will break the jailbreak until such time as the jailbreak community addresses the new iOS update. Essentially, once you jailbreak your phone, you are subject to the timetable of the jailbreak community.

Based entirely on anecdotal information, ever fewer people are jailbreaking their phones as the Apple iOS ecosystem addresses more of the wants other community.
Userlevel 1
andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

@David: Thanks for that clarification.  I wish I was one of the majority who didn't feel the need to jailbreak.  Maybe by the time I actually finish mulling it, an app will come out to address the key need (in my original post).  In fact, my whole reason for moving from Cyanogenmode to iPhone is to avoid this messy hand jamming of customizations.

@Wat: I appreciate the clarification about patches vs. major updates.  Regarding the minor versions to "update, patch bugs and security fixes multiple times a year", would the means of upgrading be similar enough to a major upgrade that it would break a jailbreak, as indicated by David above?
Userlevel 1
andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

Bummer.  This means that customization apps that rely on jailbreaking are ephemerally functional at best, assuming that one does not want to put off upgrades.  What a weird game that is.  Thanks again for illuminating the situation.
Userlevel 7
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andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

If you upgrade (and hence removes the jailbreak) then re-jailbreak, you will have to re-customize your jailbreak apps again.  It is a pain.  When I jailbreak I do not upgrade my iOS unless I absolutely have to (ex. an app I need will not function without the update).  Then you need to restore/update via itunes.  Do not factory reset a jailbroken phone as it can brick the phone.

If you want the latest iOS updates, I do not recommend jailbreaking.  I would recommend a Google Pixel phone, using Xposed
Userlevel 1
andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

Yes, I'm beginning to realize how unviable jailbreaking is if you want to keep iOS up-to-date.  As for going Android, I switched to the Apple ecosystem because I "trust" them to respect my privacy a bit more -- as much as one can "trust" the two titans based on reading people's opinions & rationale online.  I don't like how Google Play took over and activated all the services on my Cyanogenmod phone, I don't like the fact that Google Play is essentially a meta OS, which makes running Cyanogenmod of questionable value.  I like the idea that the Apple app store is a bit more curated rather than being a wild west.  I don't like the fact that carriers get to customize a stock Android OS, or delay upgrades.  I am hopeful that Apple's business model, which is not to sell consumer info to vendors, means that they are less motivated to track users and amass data (albeit aggregate data, hopefully).  It's not possible to know for sure which titan is more benevolent -- one can only make an informed guess.
Userlevel 7
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andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

Even though it might be unviable, it's still better then Android. Usually, a JB will come with major iOS changes.
Userlevel 1
andymhancock wrote:

By the way, would anyone be able to provide a gut feel for the frequency of iOS upgrades?  F...

Agreed.  JBing isn't the only factor that makes it hard to keep Android up to date.  There's the carrier delay in propagating upgrades, and for 3rd party open source variants like Cyanogenmod, there's the debilitating fragmentation of hardware platforms and the lack of dedicated staff to keep the versions for each platform up to date.

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