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Blackberry shouldn't just be for the wealthy. Secure data for everyone!!


Offer contracts. As much as I hate them, your phones are just too damn expensive. At this point the most secure phone is BlackBerry - by a mile. So my choices are an unsecured Android phone, or another Curve. With only 256MB of memory, this thing barely checks Twitter without crashing, forget about clicking an internet link. Unfortunately, I can either pick up a free (and useless) Curve, or shell out $500-600 for the Z10/Q10. What kind of a choice is this? I can't leave Koodo because for some reason you guys are the ONLY network that gets service in Northern Ontario and Northern Saskatchewan. Also, the tab rewards are far too small, especially when compared to a company like Rogers which provides cash towards phones and accessories. Don't get me wrong, I still love Koodo the bestest - but your phone selection is horrendous, unless you have money burning a hole in your pocket - or don't expect to be able to access the internet. In 2013.

60 replies

Userlevel 2
The Q5 will be out here soon, it'll be a little cheaper then the Z10/Q10. If Koodo works where you are, then Telus must as well? Have you looked at what you could get through them? I agree the perks/subsidies are much lower with Koodo then they are with anyone else, but unfortunately that's how Koodo has decided to position itself. I wouldn't expect that to change.
Really? You think that a $400-500 Q5 phone is a suitable alternative? The actual "cheap" version is being released in India and China. "There's a cheap plastic chassis, QWERTY-keyboard, 3.1-inch 720p display, 1.2GHz dual-core processor, 2GB of RAM, 8GB of internal storage, 2MP front camera and 5MP rear facing snapper." In other words, I can still grab a Galaxy SII X that kicks this thing's butt, for less than half the price as long as I don't mind sharing my data with the whole world. And no, Telus does not work in the same places. I have no explanation for this, but I can say that I have yet to find an area in Northern Saskatchewan where I don't have service on Koodo - even with a crappy little LG phone - and only a handful where I can't stream youtube. Standing beside me - a dozen people with Telus, Rogers and Bell phones cursing and wondering what my magic is. 😉 The tab takes years to clear off, even on a high use plan. I would rather lock in to Koodo as an option, and pay a reasonable price for the phone. Some actual phone selection couldn't hurt either. My friend has had the waterproof Sony for MONTHS. Thank you Rogers....
Userlevel 2
None wrote:

Really? You think that a $400-500 Q5 phone is a suitable alternative? The actual "cheap" version ...

Well those are the only choices you have if you want a Blackberry right now, it's Z10, Q10, or Q5 (unless you go legacy, you could pick up a Bold 9900 fairly cheap). Maybe Blackberry will eventually make a $150-$250 outright device for the discount market, but until then those are the options. Koodo uses Telus towers, and occasionally Bell if Telus isn't in range. If someone is able to get better reception on Koodo then with Telus, their are other factors in play. An updated sim card perhaps, newer firmware with improved radio, etc. I think your real issue is with the lack of subsidies or rewards on Koodo. If you could walk into a Koodo store right now and get a Z10 or Q10 for $99 on a two year contract would that be your ideal situation? Also, their is a reason Android devices tend to have such higher specs then other OS platforms, it's because that's the only thing the manufacturers can do to differentiate their products as Android is freely available to anyone. Regardless of what specs you get on that S2X, you're still running 2.3.3 on a device it isn't designed exclusively for.
None wrote:

Really? You think that a $400-500 Q5 phone is a suitable alternative? The actual "cheap" version ...

That is, in fact, the ideal situation. Hell, I'd pay $250 and a two year contract. I love the service, just hate the price of the hardware. :O)
None wrote:

Really? You think that a $400-500 Q5 phone is a suitable alternative? The actual "cheap" version ...

Koodo is not doing contracts and will eventually move away from the Iphone contract.
Userlevel 7
Badge +4
None wrote:

Really? You think that a $400-500 Q5 phone is a suitable alternative? The actual "cheap" version ...

Alexi, what's your source for Koodo getting rid of the iPhone contract?
Userlevel 4
None wrote:

Really? You think that a $400-500 Q5 phone is a suitable alternative? The actual "cheap" version ...

It's just a speculation given the word "eventually" was used.
Userlevel 7
From what I understand, the Q5 is intended for emerging markets and likely won't find its way to North America http://m.crackberry.com/how-does-q5-add-blackberry-story
Here's an idea - add $50 to each customer's tab after each year of service. Three years in, your tab would be $300 - still leaving you with a $350-450 bill, depending on your phone choice. It's insane. I can buy a playbook for $99, and just picked up a top of the line Toshiba 17" laptop on sale for $500. The idea that they can offer me a $700 phone and be proud of their $150 tab is a little insulting to their customers. No one else costs this much up front, and as a long time customer, I'm literally being forced out. Last time I went to a Koodo store, I was told that if I didn't want to use an Android phone I should find another provider. I may just have to do that.
Chad, this seems to have changed. They'll be releasing the Q5 in North America and Europe - but it will have double the price tag. Your thank you.gift for buying Canadian, I suppose?
Userlevel 7
As far as android not being secure... of story. E-mail and security on Android Lets get the big bear out of the way - Exchange.  Exchange e-mail is secure.  Doesn't matter if you're using a Palm, Windows Mobile, a BlackBerry, an iPhone, or two cans and a string. All security is configured on the server, and the clients must comply or they don't get access.  This is why Exchange support up until Android 2.1 flat out sucked.  The client did not support the most commonly used security configurations, and either the server admin changed them (unsafe!) or the user was forced to use another method to get Exchange mail.  Thankfully, Eclair has addressed a lot of these issues and HTC has picked up most of the rest.  Exchange support isn't perfect.  It isn't as good as Windows Mobile.  But it's finally good enough for most cases.  Droid and N1 users -- if your server admin can't get you up and running on his system, think about following the path of darkness and root your phone and install a Sense ROM, or look to a third party solution like Touchdown .  There's a good chance this will get you compliant. Any other e-mail isn't secure.  Period.  Blackberry BIS or GMail can encrypt data from the mail server to your handset or web browser, but all e-mail data between regular mail servers on the internet is sent in plain text.  The ONLY way to secure your e-mail is by using encryption or to use VPN to connect to a private network's internal mail server.  If it goes across the intertubes, anyone with a little ambition and some free black-hat style software can intercept it and see what you're sending or receiving.  Lots of people will try to say differently, and they probably even believe it, but that doesn't make it so.  If e-mail was secure in nature, there would be no draw for expensive solutions like Exchange, BES, or VPN.  The e-mail you send to your friend telling them how wasted you got during Hempfest '09, or the naughty pictures you send to your more special friends is out there for the taking.  I wish it weren't, but it is -- unless you're taking some extra precautions to make it so. The scariest part of the whole thing is just how easy it is to intercept an e-mail and read it.  If you or I can do it, bet your last dollar that those genius kids out there can do it easier, better, and faster.  The good news is that nobody is likely to be reading your e-mail unless you give them a reason to.  Billions of messages are flying around at any one moment, and yours is just one of them unless you make it attractive somehow. Enough doomcasting (I sooo stole that line from Keith and Dieter 😛 ), let's look at some ways to fill in any gaps in the security model of Android. Taken from: http://m.androidcentral.com/android-security-and-you
Userlevel 7
Badge +4
Here in North America we (not directed at you, Kim! this is a general statement based on my observations!!) have been brainwashed too many years to actually think that subsidized phones are what we actually pay for them... most people forget they have to bend over backwards for 3 long years to finally pay it off... For example one of my neighbours got himself a "$150 iPhone 4S" but has to pay $50 per month for minutes and data he doesn't even remotely come close to using... and will be locked into that contract for almost two more years. Yet, I know for a fact that when the time comes, he'll get himself a shiny new iPhone 6 or whatever will be the latest & greatest by then, only to start the $150+$50x36 cycle all over again... yet he laughed himself silly over me buying my own phone (which was $350 for a Nexus, actually)... and enjoying the $15 per month Koodo plan I'm using. It's this frame of mind that I tend to see in your posts here too, and it is fine if you are happy with it, but if you'd start to actually doing the math, you'd be surprised how much you could SAVE 🙂 Still... who am I to judge so you should go with the plan that makes you the happiest 🙂
Sophia wrote:

Here in North America we (not directed at you, Kim! this is a general statement based on my obser...

That USED to be the case, you are correct. But again, my friend with the waterproof Rogers Sony phone pays the exact same amount I do, gets the exact same features and services, and got her phone for exactly $0. Oh, and she can change her plan as often as she likes - same limits as Koodo. Contracts are not the prisons they used to be. And have you considered how long it will take you to pay off your tab on a $15 dollar plan? What are you paying on it per month, like $0.75? Pfft - what's 200 months when you don't have a contract? ;O)
Userlevel 6
Sophia wrote:

Here in North America we (not directed at you, Kim! this is a general statement based on my obser...

As of December all phones will be paid off in exactly 2 years, so it's moot point. Also, last I checked Rogers came in dead last for overall service according to Canadians. Koodo? First. Just saying. 🙂
If you think that email is your only concern, you haven't been keeping up. "According to security gurus Symantec, Android owners who use the official Facebook app are having their phone numbers stored without their knowledge. This is standard practice when using the contact sync feature in the Facebook app, but this security flaw is sending mobile numbers to Facebook servers as soon as the app is opened. Oh boy. Norton found this security flaw while running a routine test with their Mobile Insight app, which uses various analysis techniques to seek out risky and malicious behavior in Android apps. “Of particular note, Mobile Insight automatically flagged the Facebook application for Android because it leaked the device phone number. The first time you launch the Facebook application, even before logging in, your phone number will be sent over the Internet to Facebook servers. You do not need to provide your phone number, log in, initiate a specific action, or even need a Facebook account for this to happen. According to Google Play, hundreds of millions of devices have installed the Facebook application and a significant portion of those devices are likely affected. We reached out to Facebook who investigated the issue and will provide a fix in their next Facebook for Android release. They stated they did not use or process the phone numbers and have deleted them from their servers.” – Official Symantec Blog While the cause of the security flaw is unknown, Facebook has promised to provide a fix for this problem in the next update of their official Android app. For the sake of our privacy, let’s hope that happens soon. [Via: Android Authority , Symantec Blog] Listen - there's a reason that there's only ONE company that security services use. That government uses. That the secret service, the FBI, the NSA and the CIA use. It's blackberry. There's a reason. :O)
None wrote:

If you think that email is your only concern, you haven't been keeping up. "According to secur...

Clearly, you are set in what you want. So go and enjoy your blackberry, but stop bringing your hate for other phones. This is a discussion board for Koodo, you could at least respect it as such.
Userlevel 6
None wrote:

If you think that email is your only concern, you haven't been keeping up. "According to secur...

I would say that this is less an Android thing as it is a Facebook thing. To my knowledge, having never used Facebook, the general privacy mission at Facebook can be summed up as "privacy, what's that?"
Userlevel 1
None wrote:

If you think that email is your only concern, you haven't been keeping up. "According to secur...

This isn't a security flaw, it’s a feature. An associate of mine asked me to find out “how” Facebook decided to “suggest” his girlfriend as a suggested friend to his wife 🙂 She wasn't on his Facebook as a friend but they harvested the phone numbers from his contacts and recent calls, matched it up with her Facebook profile and suggested her to people that were on his Facebook friends list (like his wife)! Let’s not debate the morals of a married man with a girlfriend; the “fact” is that he had no contact with this girlfriend on Facebook leaving the app and his phone as the only connection. He also didn't knowingly grant access to his contacts and recent calls to the app, it came preinstalled. I often wonder why people “think” Blackberry is so secure. They have had to share their encryption technology with various governments as a precondition to being able to enter that market. People like Edward Snowden work for these governments 🙂 The security hasn't necessarily been cracked but rather openly given away in the interest of commerce and therefore openly in the wild.
Userlevel 7
Badge +4
None wrote:

If you think that email is your only concern, you haven't been keeping up. "According to secur...

Facebook doesn't sync with your phone unless you allow it to by clicking the option when first opening Facebook. If he's friends on Facebook with any of his girlfriends friends then that is how she was suggested not by anything on your actual phone that isn't connected to Facebook.
Lol, not hate, just the facts. If I had android, I'd want to know my phone numbers are being sold to the highest bidder. Not to mention the general swiss-cheese like security of Android apps. No, thanks, I'll stick with the security.
None wrote:

Lol, not hate, just the facts. If I had android, I'd want to know my phone numbers are being sold...

Never ever had any security issues with Android. Don't bash something when you haven't even tried it. Oh and on the new Blackberries, the data works just like androids data.
Userlevel 6
None wrote:

Lol, not hate, just the facts. If I had android, I'd want to know my phone numbers are being sold...

Kim, it doesn't matter what device you own. If you think that whoever is interested in whatever you are doing (I seriously doubt they would be) can't get it because you have a bb you are sorely mistaken. They will find out regardless. Maybe not the websites you are visiting specifically but everything else yes. A couple of 14 year old could do that.
Userlevel 2
None wrote:

Lol, not hate, just the facts. If I had android, I'd want to know my phone numbers are being sold...

The real security comes when/if you're running an enterprise server. Then you can lock your device and data tunnels down pretty decently. If you're using just 'regular' data though, you're certainly susceptible no matter what device you're using. Although I do think it's fair to say that if you run android you're a bit more vulnerable considering the OS source code is freely available.
Userlevel 7
Badge +4
I think your way too worried about your so called privacy, as soon as you go on the Internet with any device you've lost the same amount of your privacy so if your that worried don't use the Internet. If you have nothing to hide as well you shouldn't be so worried about it. I've used Android devices for years and Never had any issues with my privacy or viruses /malware, it's as safe as using your PC as long as you use an anti virus protection app just like you do on your PC and when you download anything it will scan it and let you know if it's fully safe or contains anything serious all the way to will it push ads to your device. Unless you are high up in a company and need to overly protect company materials (which I'm sure your not if your worried about prices at all) then don't worry about it nobody cares what your doing just as much as nobody cares what I'm doing. Your reading way too much into the media crap and getting way too paranoid over nothing. As far as wanting contracts and this phone that your friend has I don't understand why you haven't just gone to the same carrier and got the same things your friend has if it's so great, curious what's stopping you?
Paul "Kid Android" Deschamps wrote:

I think your way too worried about your so called privacy, as soon as you go on the Internet with...

Hmmm... I was under the assumption that this was a place to discuss Koodo ideas. Here's my idea - offer these top of the line phones with optional contracts so that people can afford them. If Koodo would rather me just switch companies, why are they asking for input? I'm staggered by the hostility here. You don't like it, leave seems to be the mantra. Way to be open and helpful Koodo!!

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