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Pay my Cancellation Fee - Incentive to switch from Bell/Rogers and/or Rogers to Koodo!


Instead of giving me a discount on a phone, give me an upfront bonus to help pay the penalty to get out of a contract from Rogers/Bell to Koodo. I would love to switch but I have about a year left on my terrible contract.

39 replies

There are so many responses I could go with this, so I'll just say this. No, it's a terrible idea. No provider should pay for another customer's contract. If you want out of your contract, you pay for it. Do you go to another car dealership and ask them to pay the rest of your current car off? Please, take time to think about ideas. No good comes out by just spouting out random stuff.
Userlevel 5
I agree with Marcus on this one. What incentive is there for a Carrier to do this, when they have no reason to believe you'll be with them long term. If another carrier were to offer to pay off your contract would you leave Koodo for them? Seems like a really poor business decision to me.
Sorry guys but I disagree. Koodo could forward you $150 towards the cost of your cancellation and then put it on your tab. Over time it could be worked down to $0. If you decide to leave Koodo, just pay the remaining balance. Not much different than getting a new phone with Koodo.
Userlevel 5
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

Sorry guys but I disagree. Koodo could forward you $150 towards the cost of your cancellation an...

F a c e P a l m
Userlevel 2
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

Sorry guys but I disagree. Koodo could forward you $150 towards the cost of your cancellation an...

Agreeing with Jorden & Marcus. The tab has no money value and is only used to reduce the price of the phone.
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

Sorry guys but I disagree. Koodo could forward you $150 towards the cost of your cancellation an...

Perhaps that is what the tab is being used for now but it is basically a debt you owe to the company. Transferring a debt/balance is something the credit card companies actively try to do to make more money in the long term.
You seem confused about the Tab. Outside of using the tab towards the retail price of the phone, the Tab has no monetary value, rendering your idea null & void.
A scenario to consider: - Customer has 6 months left in a Bell contract where they owe $20/month to break the contract. - Customer goes to Koodo booth and ports phone number over to Koodo. - Customer gets termination fee bill from Bell and pays it - Customer sends a copy of the bill (fax/scan) to Koodo showing they paid the termination fee and are now a Koodo customer - Koodo gives the customer a $120 credit to their account and adds $120 to the tab Koodo gains a customer for the 6 months (at a fee of $40/month or whatever they happen to sign up for). $240 in additional income (6 * 40) they wouldn't have had otherwise. If customer leaves Koodo they still owe the $120 to clear off the tab. At the end of the day you have only transferred your debt from one company to another. Something that many credit businesses love to do to gain market share and what is probably going to be a long-term customer if they are unhappy with their current provider.
Userlevel 2
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

A scenario to consider: - Customer has 6 months left in a Bell contract where they owe $20/month...

Wind will give you a $300 credit if you have your own phone and switch to them. Not Koodo, but maybe something to consider.
Userlevel 7
Badge +4
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

A scenario to consider: - Customer has 6 months left in a Bell contract where they owe $20/month...

Unfortunately many people are unhappy no matter what... just look at review sites such as cellphones.ca. There is absolutely no guarantee that the person who was "bought" from another company will stay happy and content, what will prevent them from doing the same with their new provider? I think the answer lies within the customer themselves: sign up with a month-to-month service and you [i]know you are free to leave at any moment. Just my $0.02 🙂
Userlevel 2
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

A scenario to consider: - Customer has 6 months left in a Bell contract where they owe $20/month...

Nobody really has the traditional contracts anymore. Rogers early contract termination fee is $12.50, so as long as you're not getting a subsidized phone, you can pretty much leave anytime you want.
Userlevel 7
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

A scenario to consider: - Customer has 6 months left in a Bell contract where they owe $20/month...

You can still leave any time you want... you just pay back what's owing on the phone + $12.50. That extra fee is $50 on Telus so that's something I don't like but Telus has some better offers right now. It's basically a 3-year tab but there's some great 2 year offers now as well. Koodo still has better rate plans so its a toss-up... think about this scenario: I walked into a dealership and paid no money down for a 2013 Dodge Dart. I didn't have $22,000 sitting around nor did I have any money saved up for a down payment for the car but I could afford the financing - a similar idea applies to cellular devices these days for some consumers.
Userlevel 2
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

A scenario to consider: - Customer has 6 months left in a Bell contract where they owe $20/month...

I agree, it's a toss up, everyone essentially operates the same way now. If you don't take a phone on subsidy, you're pretty much in the clear to move around as you desire, regardless of which provider you're with, even if your 'term' isn't up. Once you get a phone on subsidy though, whether it's with Koodo or someone else, you're responsible to honour that commitment, as you should be.
You signed the CONTRACT. You pay if you want out. You should be the one to incur monetary damages for breaking your contract
Userlevel 6
This is just not fair in general. I know previous Bell customers who bought out 2 lines of their contract ($800) to join Koodo with their family. What makes you special that Koodo would give you money to put towards your contract? There are many alternatives, you could get people from kijiji to shoulder your remaining term by giving them your Bell phone for free and they'll pay for the remaining term of your contract. Like Brian said above, you signed a Contract with them. Plus, I dont know any cell market in the world that steals customers this way. It is unprofessional and unethical.
Badge +4
Erwin wrote:

This is just not fair in general. I know previous Bell customers who bought out 2 lines of their ...

Stealing customers? Hardly. The customer in the OP's example wanted out of a contract. How is that stealing customers?
Userlevel 6
Erwin wrote:

This is just not fair in general. I know previous Bell customers who bought out 2 lines of their ...

Still considered steeling because they have a contract and they have to be in their network for a specific period of time, otherwise they get a penalty. We think differently rikkster, I hope you have a great day and thank you for choosing my opinion to argue with.
Badge +4
Erwin wrote:

This is just not fair in general. I know previous Bell customers who bought out 2 lines of their ...

Precisely. They paid the penalty as was stated in the example. There's no free ride.
Userlevel 2
Erwin wrote:

This is just not fair in general. I know previous Bell customers who bought out 2 lines of their ...

Agreed. Breaking a contract is not a criminal offence. Stealing is. Their is a very discernible difference.
Is it unfair to change lenders on your mortgage? What if the bank you are moving to even pays the early termination fee? What about using credit card cheques to pay off a balance from another higher interest account? Wind is offering up to 300 in credits if you switch to them. To call this practice unethical is a bit of a stretch in my opinion. If a customer feels trapped and another company can help the customer with superior service then why not. Choice is good.
Badge +4
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

Is it unfair to change lenders on your mortgage? What if the bank you are moving to even pays th...

Agreed.
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

Is it unfair to change lenders on your mortgage? What if the bank you are moving to even pays th...

1.If you activate on our WIND20 plan – You will receive monthly credits of $5 to a maximum of $100 2.If you activate on our WIND30 plan – You will receive monthly credits of $10 to a maximum of $200 3.If you activate on our WIND40 plan – You will receive monthly credits of $15 to a maximum of $300 Said credits are dependant on the plan that you take. You aren't going to get the full $300 if you go with the $20 plan. You aren't going to find any company(mobile anyways) that will offer to pay your termination fee. If you want out, then you pay for it. Car Dealership X won't help you pay your lease from Car Dealership Y just so you sign a car with them.
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

Is it unfair to change lenders on your mortgage? What if the bank you are moving to even pays th...

Also: The credit will be applied directly to your account as a bill adjustment before tax within 30 days of activation. The credit will be applied in up to 20 monthly installments as long as your account is in good standing (not suspended or cancelled) and as long as you continue to be eligible. The offer from Wind is weak at best. As long as you read everything into it, no sane person would take that offer.
Userlevel 7
Badge +4
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

Is it unfair to change lenders on your mortgage? What if the bank you are moving to even pays th...

Wish I could star your first comment, Marcus. As much as I like a bargain - it is just unreasonable to expect somebody to pay off your debt. To take your own example, Brad, when a bank agrees to take over your mortgage, they won't pay it off for you, it just gets shifted from A to B but you're still the one who's paying. There are no bad ideas, just bad executions, so I just don't think yours will likely see the light of day... but if it does, I'd be very happy for everybody involved 😃
Brad Veenvliet wrote:

Is it unfair to change lenders on your mortgage? What if the bank you are moving to even pays th...

It's arrogant to ask another company to pay for your termination fee.

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