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how to identify a private caller


i was wondering if it's possible to identify a private caller ?

17 replies

Userlevel 7
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Sadly, no... if somebody has turned off their caller ID, there is no way to identify who they are. Only a court order would reveal that information.
How do i get a court order?
Userlevel 7
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Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

I think this information pertains to the USA, but is probably not much different in Canada: http://thelawdictionary.org/article/best-way-to-get-the-number-from-a-blocked-call/

So in short, you will probably have to contact Koodo Legal and present your case to them.
Userlevel 4
Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

I have a curiosity. I do not understand W H Y the "private caller" option exist. This is an option that can be used O N L Y by crooks, by someone who wants to commit a criminal or, at least, an improper action. There is no reasons to hide our identity when we call somebody. Not that I care, when I see "private caller" on my display I just han up.
Userlevel 7
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Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

There are lots of folks with unlisted numbers who definitely are not crooks. My physician's cell phone is a private number. Yours?

In addition, many desk numbers in large organizations report the Front Desk to caller ID, so effectively the same as private number.

Userlevel 7
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Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

Hospitals and government agencies with large PBX systems often just default to Private Number.

You can get skunked if you arbitrarily reject these calls. Takes only 1 nasty letter from the authorities saying they have tried unsuccessfully to reach you, so now you have to reapply for a waiting list to cure that habit.

Userlevel 4
Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

Mine is definitely not hidden. Honest persons do not need to hide the phone number when they call someone unless they "need to hide something". I know very well the health care world and I know that many physicians are better off hiding their numbers. Does yours? 
Userlevel 7
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Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

Different people, different needs 🙂 let's concentrate on helping Rico, discussing the pros and cons of private caller ID doesn't add too much to the solution (no matter how interesting the discussion)
Userlevel 7
Badge +4
Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

I have to use my personal cell phone to contact customers when on call. I'd rather they not have my direct number. For this reason, outbound call display is turned off on my phone.
Userlevel 4
Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

I will  N E V E R  be your customer, of course.
Userlevel 7
Badge +4
Rico Lvg wrote:

How do i get a court order?

Not unless you move to Thunder Bay, no.
Userlevel 2
There is one way that can be considered a grey area legally and is not as reliable due to spoofing numbers through phone cards, VOIP calls, or using other services (eg. skype); I have also not tested this as I do not have any Toll-free numbers.

What you can do is purchase a Toll-free number from a provider (eg. CallCentric, Voip.ms,) and forward your cell calls to that Toll-free number. What happens is that the Toll-free number needs to know what number to pay and relies on an ANI (Automatic number identification), or the  subscribers "hard-coded" phone number (caller-id is easier to change) , so the caller's provider gets paid for the call. When you set your call as private you're not really blocking the number but instead flagging the call for privacy which the phone provider honours and gives the called person "Private" on their call display.

A court order is the best plan as the number will usually have been sent as mentioned above and harassment calls can usually be traced back for this reason. The Trapcall app (ie. used to unblock numbers)  used the method above but the CRTC  basically stepped in and put a stop to the app in Canada hence the possible grey area.

The concern over the unmasking service was potential for certain people (eg. domestic violence victims, police, social workers) to be put at risk should their number be found out.
Userlevel 4
demon_390 wrote:

There is one way that can be considered a grey area legally and is not as reliable due to spoofin...

I wonder if I can get the Trapcall app in the US. If the answer is yes, I will make a trip South just to download the app.
Userlevel 2
demon_390 wrote:

There is one way that can be considered a grey area legally and is not as reliable due to spoofin...

It does require a subscription and you have to disable Koodo's voice-mail (this was stated when they were still available up here) due to the fact that you need to reject blocked numbers which will cause the call to go to Koodo's voicemail instead of trapcall if you leave the voicemail enabled, trapcall does have their own voicemail. It's not actually illegal  but the CRTC kind of pressured them to pull out. Trapcall is still available in the US but there is no guarantee that it will work up here now. Here are the setup instructions for trapcall.

Unfortunately I do not know if the service would work here now and/or they might block non-US customers.

For me, I rarely get blocked calls anymore and there are ways around having any information passed or even worse passing fake information (a trick often used by scammers) .
Userlevel 4
demon_390 wrote:

There is one way that can be considered a grey area legally and is not as reliable due to spoofin...

I will try Trapcall. But I do not need to block calls (for that purpose there are many apps here in Canada) I .need to go around the "private caller" option and reveal the caller name or number. I do not think that CRTC would block anything, they are not even good at managing the "do not call" list that should prevent telemarketers to disrupt your supper time.
Userlevel 2
demon_390 wrote:

There is one way that can be considered a grey area legally and is not as reliable due to spoofin...

Your're not really blocking calls (though it does have that feature) but rejecting the private number call sends it  to Trapcall who then sends it back to you with the the unmasked phone number.
Userlevel 4
demon_390 wrote:

There is one way that can be considered a grey area legally and is not as reliable due to spoofin...

Gotcha, thank you

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